Booxby's Summer Reading List 2017

We asked our team to name their top 3 favorite books of 2017 (so far)...to inspire your heart and enhance your mind this summer. Enjoy! #summervacationreading

Holly Payne - CEO

The Surrender Experiment by Michael Singer – compelling biography about a divinely directed life. Yogi-turned computer programmer who disrupts the medical industry. Mind blowing.

The Untethered Soul – Michael Singer’s life changing treatise about the power of our thoughts. It will wake you up and change your game. Great book to learn the secret to being in flow.

Big Little Lies – Liane Moriarty, chilling page turner, an eerie, accurate portrait of hyper competitive suburbia the deception and masks worn by those in serious pain—trying to keep up appearances.
 

Mark Bregman - Co-Founder and Advisor 

Economism by James Kwak.  Great explanation of how a simplistic understanding of economics has led us to the current state of business and income inequality

Berlin Stories by Christopher Isherwood. Beautifully and scarily evokes the period of 1930's Berlin. 

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. Particularly relevant story of a dysfunctional society.

Josh Conviser - Strategy and Author Relations

The Gone-Away World by Nick Harkaway. Wildly imaginative, funny and very well written.

The Vorh by Brian Catling. Not sure I loved this book, but can’t stop thinking about it. If you’re into surrealistic fiction, you’ll like it.

A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. Engaging, well written, and fantastic characters.

Justin Wang - Data Science Intern, Chief Corpus Builder

East of Eden by John Steinbeck - selfless innocence marries pure evil, unforgettable characters, Steinbeck's classic bucolic style.

The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion. Didion's first person account of grief, pompous denial of pain and stiff emotional barriers.

Grokking Algorithms - cute illustrations, stories, and simple, straightforward explanations for computer science concepts.

 

Jonathan Lansey - NLP Data Scientist

The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson

In The Stars, by John Green (it isn't out until Oct., but I really respect John Green)

A Christmas Carol in Prose by Charles Dickens (small but good)

Michael Beebe - Finance

Waging Heavy Peace:  A Hippie Dream by Neil Young. As a diehard Neil Young fan, I love finding his voice in any medium.  This is a fun somewhat self-indulgent autobiography, which I finally got to on my April break.  Also try his graphic novel Greendale.

Numero Zero by Umberto Eco. This is Eco's last work before his death.  A wild historical conspiracy in a small package.  Classic Eco.

Jason Sroka - Chief of Analytics

The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis. A really interesting and well-written review of some seminal work in psychology and the duo of researchers who spearheaded the field.

The Night's Dawn Trilogy - Amazingly fleshed out space opera with an impressive array of characters and interwoven storylines that touch on themes big and small.

Women Who Work: Rewriting the Rules for Success by Ivanka Trump (yeah right!)

 

Stu Powers - Lead Developer

          The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay

          Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig

          Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson

 

Bo Vargas - A.I. Advisor

Negotiating the Impossible by Deepak Malhotra - understanding framing

Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet by Kim Zetter - no comment

Blockchain Revolution by Don Tapscott - building ICO